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Teaching Writing To Grade 1, 2 And 3: Writing Teacher’s Roadmap

picture of girl working at her de

Are you looking for help teaching writing to your grade 1, 2, and 3 students? Check out the Writing Teacher’s Roadmap. The roadmap is a three-step process for teaching writing to your kids.

Not sure if you need the roadmap for teaching writing?

Ask yourself:
  • Do you have a plan for teaching writing to your students?
  • Are you clear on what skills you need to teach?
  • Do you know what to teach first?
  • Do you know what to teach next?

If you answered “no” to any of these questions … the Writing Teacher’s Roadmap is for you!

We know that teaching writing to your students can be a struggle. The Writing Teacher’s Roadmap is here to help you teach writing to your students.

What is the Writing Teacher’s Roadmap?

The Writing Teacher’s Roadmap is a guide for you to follow when teaching your Grade 1, 2, and 3 students to become better writers.

Why do you need the Writing Teacher’s Roadmap?

The Writing Teacher’s Roadmap allows you to confidently teach writing skills to your primary students. The roadmap provides clear directions on how to get all the students in your class writing, make writing a daily habit, and support students as they master writing skills through fun, enjoyable activities.

checklist for the writing teacher's roadmap when creating a plan for teaching writing to grade 1, 2, and 3 students

Materials for this blogpost

Download your copy of the Writing Teacher’s Roadmap and work through the different steps and actions.

What are the steps to teach writing to beginners?

✴️ Step 1: Get Your Kids Writing

The first step in helping your students become better writers is to get them writing.

Ask yourself: 

  • Do your students write for at least ten minutes each day?
  • Do you provide quick, fun, and engaging writing activities that your students are excited to complete?
  • Do you plan out the writing activities so that ALL the students in your class will be successful?
  • Do you provide examples or samples of each writing activity to give your students ideas for their own writing?
  • Do you make sure that ALL your students are writing and non one sitting with a blank page in front of them?

Need strategies to get your kids writing?

  • Use fun, engaging activities to motivate your students to write.
  • Keep activities simple and easy-to-complete in a short amount of time.
  • Choose activities on topics that students are interested in.
  • Give your students an example of a completed piece of writing, a rubric,  or demonstrate the activity so they know what is expected of them.
  • Provide needed supports to students so they will be successful with their writing.

✴️ Step 2: Make Daily Writing A Habit

Once you get kids writing … make it a habit. You want your kids writing every day to give them the practice they need to become better writers.

Ask yourself:

  • Have you established a daily 5 to 10 minute writing routine in your classroom so that your students are practicing their writing every day?
  • Do you provide your students with a choice of writing topics so they can easily choose what they want to write about?
  • Do you ensure your students’ writing success by providing target questions to get them thinking of ideas to write?
  • Do you focus on the content of your students’ writing rather than on the mechanics and structure?

Ready to establish a daily writing routine in your classroom?

  • Set aside 5 to 10 minutes each day to write.
  • Write at the same time each day to establish a routine.
  • Provide students with a choice of writing topics.
  • Offer ‘own choice’ as an option for students who already have something to write about.
  • Give students target questions to help those needing extra support.
  • Discuss target questions with students if needed for them to be successful.

a copy of the writing teacher's roadmap with the first two steps checked when creating a plan to teach writing to kids

✴️ Step 3: Keep Them Writing

Your kids are writing on a daily basis … it’s time to keep them writing. There are 5 different actions you can take to keep your students writing.

✅ Action A: Practice Writing

Ask yourself:

  • Do you have a plan of how you’ll present writing skills to your students to give them the skills they need to become more proficient writers?
  • Do you provide quick “writing talks” or mini lessons to your students on a regular basis to get them thinking about the different writing skills?
  • Do you focus on developing one writing skill at a time so your students can learn the skill to mastery before moving on to another writing skill?
  • Do you make sure your students have the opportunity to practice each writing skill after it is introduced so they have time to master it?

Ready to provide writing practice opportunities?

  • Be sure to provide many different opportunities for your students to practice their narrative, opinion and informative writing skills.
  • Focus on one type of writing at a time.
  • Demonstrate or provide examples of the type of writing.
  • Provide support to students so they will be successful.

Action B: Teach Writing Skills

Ask yourself:

  • Do you provide your students with different types of writing opportunities (narrative, opinion, letter writing, how-to, report writing, etc.) so they can learn how and when to use each type of writing?
  • Do you demonstrate each type of writing to your students so they can be successful?
  • Do you provide your students with ample opportunities to practice each type of writing?
  • Do you choose topics that are fun and engaging for your students so they are motivated to write?

Ready to provide writing practice opportunities?

  • Be sure to provide many different opportunities for your students to practice their narrative, opinion and informative writing skills.
  • Focus on one type of writing at a time.
  • Demonstrate or provide examples of the type of writing.
  • Provide support to students so they will be successful.

Action C: Writing in the Content Areas

Ask yourself:

  • Do you look for ways to integrate writing into the content areas?
  • Do you provide the opportunity for your students to record their learning in the content areas?
  • Do you teach your students how to make connections between what they are learning and their own lives and to the world around them?

Ready to provide writing practice opportunities?

  • Think of different ways to integrate writing into the different content areas (math, science, social studies, health, arts ed).
  • Students can write reports, keep journals, create inquiry projects, take notes, make connections to their own lives, etc.
  • Encourage students to connect and demonstrate learning through the use of graphic organizers or simple recording strategies.
  • Provide support to students as needed.

Action D: Assessing Writing

Ask yourself:

  • Do you use self, peer, and/or teacher informal assessments to gather information about your students’ writing? 
  • Do you use rubrics to informally assess the writing of your students?
  • Do your students set writing goals based on the informal assessments?
  • Do your students know how to reflect on their learning goals about writing?
  • Are your students able to determine if they need to change or set new writing goals based on the informal assessments?

Time to start assessing student writing?

  • Decide on how you will assess student writing.
  • Consider using self, peer, and teacher assessments.
  • Provide students with rubrics for the different types of writing.
  • Allow students to set goals for their writing.
  • Revisit writing goals on a regular basis so students can change or adjust goals as needed.

Action E: Providing Extra Support

Ask yourself:

  • Before beginning a writing activity, do you establish which of your students will need extra supports to be successful?
  • Do you determine beforehand what the extra supports will look like for your students who need it?
  • Do you evaluate the effectiveness of the support you provide to your students to determine if different or additional support is needed for future writing classes?

Need to provide extra support to your students?

  • Determine the learning needs of the students in your classroom.
  • Identify the supports that will help students succeed.
  • Look for supports that address a number of different learning needs so you can help multiple students by using the same support.
  • Provide supports to students as needed so they will be successful with their writing.

The Writing Teacher’s Roadmap is one of the many ideas found in 101 Writing Ideas.

Want ALL 101 ideas?

Simply click the image below!

Check out the 101 teaching writing activities for grade 1, 2, and 3 students.

Don’t forget to Pin this lesson on planning!

girl at her desk writing in a blogpost on how to teach writing to students in the primary grades

 

Other Planning Ideas

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